Abstract

Elaborating on the history of nineteenth-century Russia, this article argues that world-regional histories and the global history approach benefit from each other. Global history has to be informed by source-based inquiries in spaces where the regional and the global meet. In the past three decades historians of nineteenth-century Russia and global historians have been affected by related imperatives: historians of Russia deconstructed a russocentric view of Russia’s past which veiled the diversity of a multiethnic empire while global historians reached out to deconstruct a eurocentric reading of world history. The article highlights case studies of Princess Olga Aleksandrovna Shcherbatova and Fedor Fedorovich Martens which shed light onto Russians‘ involvement in exploring and internationalizing the world in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Available Formats

Published

2020

How to Cite

Aust, M. (2020). On Parallel Tracks at Different Speeds: Historiographies of Imperial Russia and the Globalized World around 1900. Comparativ, 29(2), 78-105. Retrieved from https://www.comparativ.net/v2/article/view/2934